How Big Of A Solar Generator Do I Need

How big of a solar generator do I need? What if you are doing some work with a power appliance and all of a sudden electricity runs out? Frustrating right? Now, what will you do? You would definitely want to purchase a solar generator for continuous power. You will go to a marketplace and ask for a solar generator to buy but you have no idea how much power it must possess to work for you. Nevertheless, this question about solar generators should not be neglected before purchasing a solar system. How big of a solar generator do I need? Yes, this question needs your attention.

What is a solar generator?

Before telling you how big a solar generator does. A quick explanation about your solar generator. It is used for storing sunlight power and converting it into electric power to run appliances. It has many components for storing power energy. The solar generator has different types, ranging from small to large sizes. The majority of them typically hold between 1000 to 3000 watts hours. Solar generators are suitable for inside and outside places as well.

How big of a solar generator do I need?

Let’s start with a quick explanation of solar generator capacity. Capacity refers to the amount of power that this device can store- and is often listed as watt-hours. Watt is a power unit your device pulls in one-hour operation for instance a light bulb requires 9 watts per hour, a laptop charger pulls 45 watts, a heating pad for cooking use 1000 watts, and a heating gun uses 1800 watts per hour. Thus, you must have to determine how many watts you anticipated to output each hour.

The procedure elaborated below may take a while because you have to calculate watts, several appliances, and the peak factor. But you have to get it done to have the right size concerning your needs. You need to go through it before buying a solar generator.

Steps for deciding how big of a solar generator you need:

Here, are the ultimate guide about what size solar generator I need. I divide this lengthy procedure for you into some easy 9 steps. These steps are as follows:

1. First, list all your appliances:

In this first step, you need to make a list of all the appliances that you want to run on your solar generator.

Following is the list of appliances I’m looking to power run on a solar generator and their numbers may vary for you according to your needs:

List of appliances: Total appliances:
LED lights 3
Mobile charger 1
Roof fans 2
Laptop 1
LED TV 1
Internet device 1
Printer 1
Refrigerator 1
Coffee maker 1
PC 1
Oven 1
Cloth dryer 1
Washing machine 1
Dishwasher 1

2. Determine the wattage of each appliance:

In this stage, you have to determine the wattage of all your appliances, you will get these values from your appliance manual guides. For my above list, the values were:

List of appliances: Watt: Total appliances:
LED lights 5W 3
Mobile charger 6W 1
Roof fans 25W 2
Laptop 65W 1
LED TV 85W 1
Internet device 30W 1
Printer 30W 1
Refrigerator 600W 1
Coffee maker 750W 1
PC 120W 1
Oven 1200W 1
Clothe dryer 5000W 1
Washing machine 1000W 1
Dishwasher 1300W 1

3. Determine usage hours of appliances:

Make a rough estimate of how much each appliance you might use in a day. Now, add the hours for each appliance accordingly.

List of appliances: Watt: Total appliances: Hours:
LED lights 5W 3 9 hours
Mobile charger 6W 1 3 hours
Roof fans 25W 2 9 hours
Laptop 65W 1 5 hours
LED TV 85W 1 3 hours
Internet device 30W 1 24 hours
Printer 30W 1 0.5 hour
Refrigerator 600W 1 24 hours
Coffee maker 750W 1 0.5 hour
PC 120W 1 3 hours
Oven 1200W 1 1 hour
Clothe dryer 5000W 1 0.5 hour
Washing machine 1000W 1 0.5 hour
Dishwasher 1300W 1 1 hour

4. Multiply the wattage hour of each appliance:

By multiplying the watt with the total appliances and the number of hours you will use, you get the wattage hour for each appliance.

List of appliances: Watt: Total appliances: Hours: Total watt hours
LED lights 5W 3 9 hours 135Wh
Mobile charger 6W 1 3 hours 18Wh
Roof fans 25W 2 9 hours 450Wh
Laptop 65W 1 5 hours 325Wh
LED TV 85W 1 3 hours 255Wh
Internet device 30W 1 24 hours 720Wh
Printer 30W 1 0.5 hour 15Wh
Refrigerator 600W 1 24 hours 14,400Wh
Coffee maker 750W 1 0.5 hour 375Wh
PC 120W 1 3 hours 360Wh
Oven 1200W 1 1 hour 1200Wh
Clothe dryer 5000W 1 0.5 hour 2500Wh
Washing machine 1000W 1 0.5 hour 500Wh
Dishwasher 1300W 1 1 hour 1300Wh

 

5. Sum it all:

In this step, add up all appliances’ total watt-hour to have a defined value.

In this scenario, I got approx. value of 22,553 total WH of all appliances.

6. Dividing with power factor:

The power factor is the ratio between the solar generator’s actual power to the perceived power. You do not have to go deep into the matter it is roughly between 0.8 to 0.9. We will take 0.85 in this example. Divide your total watts hours by the power factor i.e. 0.85.

=22,553 / 0.85

Hence, I get 26,533Wh and this means you use a 26,553Wh battery for the solar generator.

7. Calculating continuous power output:

In this step, you have to multiply the number of the appliance by its watts.

For example, if you have 3 fans and every fan use 10Watts then I multiply 3 by 10. Therefore, you have 30 Watts. I hope you got it.

Let’s calculate the continuous power output of the generator for the above appliances:

List of appliances: Watt: Total appliances: Hours: Total watt hours
LED lights 5W 3 9 hours 135Wh
Mobile charger 6W 1 3 hours 18Wh
Roof fans 25W 2 9 hours 450Wh
Laptop 65W 1 5 hours 325Wh
LED TV 85W 1 3 hours 255Wh
Internet device 30W 1 24 hours 720Wh
Printer 30W 1 0.5 hour 15Wh
Refrigerator 600W 1 24 hours 14,400Wh
Coffee maker 750W 1 0.5 hour 375Wh
PC 120W 1 3 hours 360Wh
Oven 1200W 1 1 hour 1200Wh
Cloth dryer 5000W 1 0.5 hour 2500Wh
Washing machine 1000W 1 0.5 hour 500Wh
Dishwasher 1300W 1 1 hour 1300Wh

 

                                          =10,216  * 17

                                          =173,672

Hence, the continuous power output is 173,672

Now, divide 173,672 by 0.85 and have get 204,320 Watts.

That means I need a solar generator that is bigger than 204,320 watts.

8. Checking peak power:

In this step, you have to check that your solar generator’s surge power must be higher than the peak factor. If this is not higher, it means your devices will not get started.

9. Checking the wattage of the generator solar panel:

In this step, you have to determine which wattage of solar panels will recharge the generator battery fully. If you do not use solar panels with appropriate wattage your solar generator is nothing more than a waste material.

Pro Tips: You have to use a large solar generator for using crucial appliances and a small one for small appliances.

FAQs:

Which size of your solar generator run your refrigerator?

Before sizing a solar generator for a refrigerator, you need to determine how much your refrigerator's daily consumption of energy is in a cubic foot. After knowing your refrigerator's energy consumption, you have to determine the size of your solar generator. For this purpose, you have to consider your refrigerator size, total solar panels, number of 100 watts of solar panels, battery capacities, and solar generator power. After this, you get that only two 100W solar panels with < 1 KWh battery are best for running your refrigerator.

Will your solar generator use while it is on charging?

Yes, you can use your solar generator while it is on charging. Nevertheless, I do not prefer it to you because it has many disadvantages first if you run heavy appliances while the solar generator is in charge mode, the generators are depleted. Second, continuous uses of solar generators cause a long time to charge them. Third, it is overheated.

Is solar generator costly?

Yes, a solar generator is costly because it includes different components like an inverter, battery, solar panel, etc. these individual components are expensive and make overall make it costly.

Conclusion:

In this article, I have given you a complete guideline for how big of a solar generator you need. This guideline includes listing all your appliances, determining their watts, determining working hours, determining wattage hours, counting all appliance’s wattage hours, dividing with peak factor, counting generator power output, checking peak power, and final checking generators solar panel wattage. For more detailed calculation read it in depth.

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